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We Strive to Keep You on Your Feet

Michael E. Newman, DPM
Plymouth Meeting (610) 941-6111


Blog

Tuesday, 31 January 2023

Dealing With Athlete’s Foot

Tinea is a fungus that feeds on skin, hair, and nails. Many people are familiar with athlete’s foot, also called tinea pedis. This fungal infection grows in the moist skin between the toes. Symptoms include redness, itching, and scaly or oozing skin. Athlete’s foot is highly contagious, often contracted by walking barefoot on wet floors in public showers, gym locker rooms, or swimming pool areas. In some cases, it can spread to the toenails, termed tinea unguium. This results in nails that are thick and crumbling. Be careful not to touch the infected areas of your feet, because the fungus can be easily spread to the hands, face, and other body parts. Athlete’s foot can be treated with a variety of lotions, creams, and medications. Prevention, however, is the best cure. Wear protective foot coverings in places where tinea thrives, and avoid sharing towels, foot coverings, or socks with others. Dry your feet thoroughly, especially between the toes, and wear different pairs of socks each day. For relief from a stubborn case of athletes’ foot, please see a podiatrist who can prescribe stronger antifungal medications.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Two tiny bones in the feet located just below the big toe are called the sesamoid bones. The sesamoid bones are at work each time you walk or run, providing leverage to the big toe. When these bones, which are held in place by tendons or embedded in muscle, become irritated, the result is an inflammatory condition known as sesamoiditis. It is considered an overuse injury. People who spend a lot of time on their feet for work, sports, or high-impact activities often incur sesamoiditis. In addition, people with flat feet or high arches may experience this inflammation. Symptoms generally do not emerge suddenly, but instead, develop over a period of time. You may feel intermittent pain in the big toe, notice swelling or bruising in the area, or experience a decrease in the normal functioning of the big toe. Resting the foot often is a good idea, and wearing orthotics in the shoes is another. For more information on how to deal with sesamoiditis, including being fitted for custom orthotics, please consult a podiatrist.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact one of our podiatrists of Pennsylvania. Our doctors will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis
Tuesday, 17 January 2023

Two Groups of Foot Muscles

There are many people who are persistent in exercising the muscles in their body, but may neglect their feet. The feet are the foundation of the body, and it is important to properly stretch them to help maintain adequate strength. There are two groups of muscles that are in each foot. The muscles that control the shape of the arch fall into the intrinsic foot muscles and are smaller than the global lower limb muscles. The ankle is moved and flexed by using this group of muscles, and exercising the entire foot can benefit the overall body. There is a specific foot stretch that is referred to as the short foot exercise, which is done by contracting the intrinsic muscles. The benefits of performing this exercise can increase when done while barefoot. The toes can become stronger when a toe splay is frequently practiced. This is accomplished by standing on the floor, and placing the toes apart as wide as possible. This can be repeated several times, after holding for eight seconds. There are numerous benefits of exercising the feet, and if you would like more information on effective stretches, please consult with a podiatrist.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries and build strength. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Exercise for Your Feet

Exercise for your feet can help you gain strength, mobility and flexibility in your feet. They say that strengthening your feet can be just as rewarding as strengthening another part of the body. Your feet are very important, and we often forget about them in our daily tasks. But it is because of our feet that are we able to get going and do what we need to. For those of us fortunate enough to not have any foot problems, it is an important gesture to take care of them to ensure good health in the long run.

Some foot health exercises can include ankle pumps, tip-toeing, toe rises, lifting off the floor doing reps and sets, and flexing the toes. It is best to speak with Our doctors to determine an appropriate regimen for your needs. Everyone’s needs and bodies are different, and the activities required to maintain strength in the feet vary from individual to individual. 

Once you get into a routine of doing regular exercise, you may notice a difference in your feet and how strong they may become.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Wednesday, 11 January 2023

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

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