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Ambler (215) 646-5990


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Rheumatoid arthritis or RA, is an autoimmune condition that can affect joints throughout the body. It often affects the joints of the feet and ankles. The most common joints in the feet and ankles affected by RA are the smaller joints of the toes, the joints of the forefoot, the subtalar joint between the two tarsal bones of the foot, and less commonly the ankle joint. Signs of RA in your feet include soreness, warmth and swelling of one or more joints that lasts for several days, joint erosion, joint instability, and pain. RA could also cause painful fluid-filled sacs or nodules to develop on the feet. For more information on the signs and symptoms of RA in the feet and what you can do to treat this condition, speak with a podiatrist today.

Arthritis can be a difficult condition to live with. If you are seeking treatment, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Arthritic Foot Care  

Arthritis is a joint disorder that involves the inflammation of different joints in your body, such as those in your feet. Arthritis is often caused by a degenerative joint disease and causes mild to severe pain in all affected areas. In addition to this, swelling and stiffness in the affected joints can also be a common symptom of arthritis.

In many cases, wearing ill-fitting shoes can worsen the effects and pain of arthritis. Wearing shoes that have a lower heel and extra room can help your feet feel more comfortable. In cases of rheumatoid arthritis, the arch in your foot may become problematic. Buying shoes with proper arch support that contour to your feet can help immensely.

Alleviating Arthritic Pain

  • Exercises that stretch the foot can prevent further pain and injury and increase mobility
  • Most of the pain can be alleviated with anti-inflammatory drugs, heat, and topical medications
  • Massages can help temporarily alleviate pain.

It is best to see your doctor for the treatment that is right for your needs and symptoms. Conditions vary, and a podiatrist can help you determine the right method of care for your feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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People who have peripheral artery disease (PAD), a condition that impairs circulation to the lower limbs, or have diabetes, which can also lead to poor circulation in the feet, are at an increased risk for amputation. Fortunately, these conditions can be treated and amputation can be prevented. Simple preventative measures such as being under the care of a podiatrist, participating in noninvasive vascular testing, and undergoing diabetic foot examinations can lead to better long term outcomes for patients. If you have peripheral artery disease or diabetes, it is recommended that you regularly visit a podiatrist who can help you take care of your feet.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 31 August 2020

Running vs. Walking Shoes

Whether you are a runner or a walker, the shoes that you exercise in should fit your needs. Stores tend to carry more running shoes than walking shoes, and while a runner shouldn't run in walking shoes, a walker may certainly walk in running shoes. That may sound slightly confusing, but the bottom line is that both runners and walkers can benefit from wearing running shoes while exercising as long as they buy shoes that fit their specific activity. Runners should buy shoes that have more cushioning in the heel and forefoot, while walkers generally don’t need extra cushioning in the forefoot and should opt for something more lightweight. Runners need shoes with a higher difference in height from the heel through the toe called the heel drop, while walkers should choose shoes with a heel drop of less than 8 millimeters. For more information on finding the best footwear for your needs, consult with a podiatrist. 

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 24 August 2020

Reducing Bunion Pain

Bunions are bony bumps that form on the joint of your big toe. They cause your big toe to move towards the other toes and force the joint at the base of the big toe to stick out. If your bunions are causing you pain, there are several things that you can try to relieve the pain at home. Exercising your feet by performing stretches can strengthen your muscles and improve foot flexibility, which may ease your bunion pain. For a light foot exercise, stand on a towel and scrunch it up with your toes, or lift your toes off the floor for ten seconds while keeping your heels firmly on the ground. If your bunion is inflamed, applying ice to the affected area for several minutes may help reduce inflammation. If you are suffering from bunion pain, visiting a podiatrist who can offer you the most effective treatment options is highly recommended.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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