If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site

We Strive to Keep You on Your Feet

Michael E. Newman, DPM
Plymouth Meeting (610) 941-6111


Review Us
follow us
Like us

Blog

Understanding the risk factors associated with foot stress fractures is pivotal in preemptively addressing this common injury. Repetitive stress on the foot, often incurred through high-impact activities like running or jumping, emerges as a primary catalyst. Insufficient conditioning or abrupt increases in activity levels can amplify the risk, as the bones may not be adequately prepared for the intensified load. Foot anatomy also plays a role, with individuals having high arches or flat feet being more susceptible. Wearing inadequate footwear, and lacking proper support or shock absorption, further heightens the risk. Nutritional deficiencies, especially in calcium and vitamin D, compromise bone strength, rendering them more prone to fractures. Additionally, hormonal imbalances, prevalent in conditions like female athlete triad or among those with irregular menstrual cycles, contribute to bone weakening. If you have incurred a foot stress fracture, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist who can treat it accordingly, and offer effective prevention techniques.

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

An acute ankle sprain refers to a sudden and unexpected injury to the ligaments that support the ankle joint. These ligaments can become stretched or torn when the foot twists or turns beyond its normal range of motion. This injury often results from a misstep, an awkward landing, or a sudden change in direction, such as in sports activities. The causes of an acute ankle sprain are typically linked to excessive or forceful movements that strain the ankle ligaments. Common situations include stumbling on uneven ground, stepping off of a curb, or rolling the ankle during sports activities, such as basketball or soccer. Wearing high heels and poorly fitting footwear can also increase the risk of ankle sprains by destabilizing the ankle. Understanding the definition and causes of an acute ankle sprain is essential for both prevention and timely treatment. If you have sprained your ankle, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose this condition, and offer treatment methods that are right for you.

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains

Heel pain is a common grievance that can impact people of all ages and lifestyles. To understand why it afflicts so many, it is essential to delve into its multifaceted causes. One of the primary culprits is plantar fasciitis, where the tissue connecting the heel to the toes becomes inflamed due to excessive strain, often stemming from prolonged standing, or from wearing improper footwear. Another common source of heel pain is Achilles tendonitis, an overuse injury affecting the tendon at the back of the heel, which can result from intense physical activities and inadequate rest. Heel spurs, small calcium deposits on the heel bone, can also trigger discomfort, often linked to conditions like plantar fasciitis. Additionally, various systemic diseases, such as arthritis, can manifest as heel pain. If you have heel pain for any reason, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can determine what that cause is, and offer treatment options that are right for you.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain

Plantar warts, though usually harmless, can be quite bothersome. These skin growths typically appear on the soles of your feet and can be painful, especially when walking. They are caused by a virus that accelerates the growth of the top layer of skin, resulting in the formation of warts. While plantar warts generally disappear on their own over months or even years, they can be a source of discomfort and concern. These warts are extremely contagious and can spread easily. Not only can you re-infect yourself by touching a wart and then another part of your body, but you can also transmit the virus to others by sharing personal items, like towels or socks. In most cases, plantar warts do not require treatment. However, if they cause you pain or multiply, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about All About Plantar Warts
Page 3 of 163
Connect with us