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We Strive to Keep You on Your Feet

Michael E. Newman, DPM
Plymouth Meeting (610) 941-6111


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Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the foot. Blisters can develop on the feet for several reasons, including friction from footwear, a fungal or bacterial infection, prolonged standing or foot use, a trauma to the foot, or even a sunburn. A blister will usually heal when the underlying cause is identified and eliminated. But if you have a blister on your foot, it can make standing, walking, or exercising uncomfortable. Simple home treatments can be employed to treat some blisters, such as wearing properly fitted shoes and socks or covering the blister with a bandage until it hardens and disappears. If a blister worsens or does not go away in a reasonable time frame, it is suggested you consult a podiatrist for a customized treatment regimen.

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 03 May 2022

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

If one’s diabetes is not carefully managed through diet, exercise, and insulin treatment, an all-too-common complication can be a foot ulcer. Ulcers develop because skin tissue breaks down and layers of skin underneath are exposed due to poor circulation, high blood sugar, nerve damage, and irritated or hurt feet. Foot ulcers usually develop under big toes or the balls of the feet. Symptoms to watch for are unusual swelling, irritation, redness, discoloration, drainage from the foot, and odors emanating from the feet. The most visible sign of a foot ulcer is when black tissue (known as “eschar”) surrounds the ulcer because of poor blood flow to the area. However, signs of a foot ulcer are not always present or obvious. Good foot care, including wearing properly fitting, quality shoes, maintaining good foot hygiene, proper trimming of toenails, as well as attention paid to other aspects of physical health, such as heart and kidney disease and obesity, can help with the prevention of foot ulcers. Treatment depends on the cause and severity of the ulcer. It is highly suggested to consult with a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and to obtain a treatment plan.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 26 April 2022

Unsightly Cracked Heels

Medical conditions that can include psoriasis and eczema may lead to unsightly cracked heels. It is an ailment that is caused by dry skin, and it can happen for a variety of reasons. The skin on the heels can become dry and cracked from wearing shoes that do not have a back, standing on hard surfaces for the majority of the day, or from living in a dry climate. It may be beneficial to drink plenty of fresh water daily, in addition to applying a good moisturizer on the feet before bed. In severe cases, cracks can cause pain and discomfort. Many patients find it helpful to wear shoes that are closed to protect the skin on the heels. If you suffer from this condition, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can effectively treat this condition. 

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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