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We Strive to Keep You on Your Feet

Michael E. Newman, DPM
Plymouth Meeting (610) 941-6111


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A common guideline for how long to keep running shoes is between 400 and 600 miles. But that’s only part of the story. The mileage you get from one pair depends on your weight, how you run, and the surfaces you typically run on. Plus, even though the uppers have not worn out and the tread is in good shape, the cushioning may be shot. With advances in running shoe materials, a pair of shoes that still looks to be in good shape may have worn out its welcome. One way to help determine this is to pay attention to your pain. If you feel foot, ankle or knee pain after a run, it can be a sign that your shoe’s cushioning has diminished. Midsole creases or lean patterns when viewing the shoe from the back are other signs. If you alternate pairs of running shoes, experts suggest keeping track of the mileage for each pair separately. As a runner, you may wish to have an ongoing relationship with a podiatrist who can monitor the health of both your feet and your shoes.  

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 31 May 2022

Causes of Itchy Feet

A number of conditions can cause your feet to itch. The first and probably most common cause is athlete’s foot, a fungal infection that is annoying but treatable. Symptoms of athlete’s foot include itching, redness, flaking skin between the toes or on the bottom of the feet. Another cause of itching feet is eczema, a type of skin condition that may resemble athlete’s foot but is not caused by a fungus. Instead it is thought to be caused by dry skin that is more vulnerable to irritation and allergens. Sometimes itchy and scaly skin can be caused by contact dermatitis, generally from an allergen or other irritant. Itchy feet may also be the result of psoriasis, an autoimmune disease that causes skin cells to regenerate too quickly. Hives, also known as urticaria, may cause itching, along with welts, burning or stinging. Food, medication, or a viral infection may set it off. Neuropathy, numbness caused by damaged nerves, also may result in itchiness as the body produces cytokines that can irritate the skin. If itchy feet become a serious or an ongoing problem, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist for an examination and diagnosis. 

Everyday foot care is very important to prevent infection and other foot ailments. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Everyday Foot Care

Often, people take care of their bodies, face and hair more so than they do for their feet. But the feet are a very important aspect of our bodies, and one that we should pay more attention to. Without our feet, we would not be able to perform most daily tasks.

It is best to check your feet regularly to make sure there are no new bruises or cuts that you may not have noticed before. For dry feet, moisturizer can easily be a remedy and can be applied as often as necessary to the affected areas. Wearing shoes that fit well can also help you maintain good foot health, as well as making it easier to walk and do daily activities without the stress or pain of ill-fitting shoes, high heels, or even flip flops. Wearing clean socks with closed shoes is important to ensure that sweat and bacteria do not accumulate within the shoe. Clean socks help to prevent Athlete’s foot, fungi problems, bad odors, and can absorb sweat.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tinea pedis is the medical term for a fungal infection that occurs on the feet, known as athlete’s foot. Since the fungus prefers warm, damp, dark environments, it can live in shoes, locker rooms, communal showers and swimming pool areas. Athlete’s foot is highly contagious—from both direct contact as well as indirect contact with a surface or object contaminated by the fungus. That is why it is vital to protect yourself in public spaces such as these with proper footwear. Avoid walking barefoot or sharing towels, shoes, or personal grooming utensils. Tinea pedis may spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. The symptoms of athlete’s foot include a dry, itchy, red, scaly rash that can appear on top of the foot, in between the toes, and even on the bottom of the feet. The skin may blister, crack or become inflamed, and a bacterial infection may develop in severe cases of athlete’s foot. If you contract athlete’s foot, the best course of action is to place yourself under the care of a podiatrist for proper, prompt, and permanent treatment. 

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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The medical term for an ingrown toenail is onychocryptosis. It is a painful foot condition that occurs when the toenail grows into the skin on the side of the nail. It can happen as a result of wearing shoes that do not fit properly. Additionally, it may happen from cutting the toenails incorrectly. The proper way to trim toenails is to cut them straight across, and not rounded. Ingrown toenails typically affect the big toe, and research has shown it is a more common condition among men rather than women. Incurring a foot injury may lead to developing an ingrown toenail. This can happen if the foot is jammed against a piece of furniture, or has become damaged from a heavy object dropping on it. Common symptoms of an ingrown toenail include redness, tenderness, and pain. It may feel better when the affected toe is soaked in warm water, which can make it easier to gently pull the skin away from the nail. It is suggested that if you have an ingrown toenail you are under the care of a podiatrist who can offer you proper treatment methods.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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