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Tuesday, 21 January 2020

Pain in the Back of the Leg

Patients who have experienced an Achilles tendon injury are often familiar with the pain and discomfort this condition can cause. It can often be debilitating, and may considerably restrict the ability to walk and run. This tendon is located in the calf, and it connects the calf muscles to the ankle. This type of injury can happen as a result of being overweight, exercising on uneven surfaces, or wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. Some of the symptoms that are associated with a partial or complete tear of  the Achilles tendon can include swelling, severe pain in the back of the leg, and it may be difficult to move the ankle. If you think you may have an Achilles tendon injury, please schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible so the correct treatment can begin.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries
Monday, 13 January 2020

Common Causes of Running Injuries

Many running injuries occur due to the repetitive motion the sport requires. This can often result in overuse. There are a number of reasons running injuries occur, and many of them can be prevented. For example, errors in your training can cause running injuries, as well as poor running form. A lack of stretching or warming up can also lead to damage while running. Wearing the improper footwear is another factor that influences the development of an injury due to running. Some signs of overuse include the gradual onset of pain, the feeling of stiffness or aching after a run, noticeable swelling or tenderness, and overall discomfort during or after a run. If you feel you have an injury caused by running and would like advice on treatment, we suggest you consult with a podiatrist for professional advice and care.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Preventing Running Injuries

An ingrown toenail is a foot condition that can cause severe pain and discomfort. It occurs as a result of the nail growing into the skin instead of over it. This ailment typically happens to the big toe, and may make the area look red and swollen. A common cause for ingrown toenails to develop can include wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Additionally, this condition may develop from improperly trimming the toenails. Patients may find mild relief when the affected foot is soaked in warm water several times per day. This may be helpful in lifting the nail away from the skin with a small piece of cotton. For severely infected ingrown toenails, it is suggested that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can provide the necessary treatment for recovery.

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
Monday, 30 December 2019

Who Does Sever’s Disease Affect?

If you have a teenager that frequently participates in sporting activities, it is beneficial to be informed about Sever’s disease. Your child may be experiencing the symptoms of Sever’s disease if you notice they are limping, or talking about heel pain.The most common age range this condition occurs in is typically between the ages of eight and fourteen. It occurs during growth spurts when the bones grow at a faster rate than the tendons. The symptoms many teenagers complain about can consist of heel pain while walking, and difficulty participating in activities that include running and jumping. Moderate relief may be found when the affected foot is kept elevated. Other patients have also found it beneficial to stretch the calf muscles. Additionally, wearing shoes that have adequate cushioning may help the foot to feel stable. If you feel your child has Sever’s disease, it is strongly advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can recommend the proper treatment.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease

Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 23 December 2019

Effects of Having a Stress Fracture

Stress fractures refer to having small breaks in the bone, commonly found in the second and third metatarsals of the foot. Stress fractures may not be obvious at first, however they tend to worsen overtime if not treated, and can be very painful. They typically occur due to overuse in a sporting activity, and can be prevented by gradually intensifying your workout and properly warming up before practicing an intense, high energy activity. It’s also important you wear footwear that gives your feet needed support, especially if you are running or jogging on uneven, or rugged surfaces. In terms of treatment, it is suggested that you get plenty of rest, treat the area with ice, and keep the foot elevated to avoid further swelling. We recommend you consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and an advised treatment plan.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Many people worldwide are familiar with heel pain. The heel typically absorbs the weight of the body, and can endure significant damage if there is an injury involved. A common form of heel pain can come from plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of the plantar fascia. This is a band of tissue that is located at the bottom of the foot, and connects the heel to the toes. This type of pain generally develops gradually, and can come from standing for the majority of the day. Sever’s disease affects teenagers, and targets the growth plate in the heel. This can cause considerable pain and discomfort. The condition that is referred to as tarsal tunnel syndrome is caused by a compressed nerve that is inside the ankle. The symptoms that patients notice can include a burning or tingling sensation underneath the heel. If you are experiencing any type of heel pain, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist as quickly as possible so the correct treatment can begin.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
Tuesday, 03 December 2019

Signs You May Need Orthotics

Orthotics are special, custom-made foot or heel inserts that are normally prescribed by a podiatrist to help treat foot, leg, or back issues. You may need orthotics if you are experiencing foot deformities, need assistance in the overall function of the foot, are seeking support for your ankle, or you are trying to reduce the risk of other foot related injuries. Orthotics help to treat a number of issues concerning the feet such as arthritis, bunions, hammertoes, flat feet, heel spurs, and plantar fasciitis. If you have any of these conditions or are experiencing foot pain, we recommend you seek the assistance of a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis, and to see if orthotics are the best treatment option for your discomfort.

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ankle Foot Orthotics for Athletes
Monday, 02 December 2019

Yoga for the Feet

Research has indicated when the feet are frequently stretched, the overall health of the body may improve. When proper foot and ankle stretches are practiced, certain foot conditions can be prevented, which may include plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. When yoga is practiced for the feet and ankles, the body typically becomes stronger, which may be beneficial in enhancing proper alignment in the body. It is important to recognize the four corners of the foot, and this can be done by pressing the foot into the floor while standing. This is helpful in engaging the muscles of the foot, which strengthens the ankle. If you would like additional information about the importance of keeping the feet strong, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Why Stretching Is Important for Your Feet

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first to determine if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous exercise, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising to ice and rest the foot. It is advised that you then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stretching Your Feet

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to greater issues. Give us a call, and get treated!

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