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Plymouth Meeting (610) 941-6111
Ambler (215) 646-5990


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Monday, 08 April 2019

The Ease of Wearing Flip Flops

For many women, one of the first signs of summer may include wearing flip flops. The lack of laces makes them simple to wear, and can be considered favorite shoes to wear in warm weather. There are several negative aspects flip flops have, and these may include the absence of an arch, very little or no cushioning, and a minimum amount of shock absorbers. The toes may tend to curl, which may be a natural reaction to keep the shoe from falling off. This can lead to changes in the walking pattern, which may affect different parts of the foot. Many women may notice heel pain, which can gradually develop, and this may be a result of the lack of cushioning in the heel area. It may be beneficial to consider wearing shoes that have a strap across the back, and this can help to support the foot. It is suggested to speak with a podiatrist if you have questions about how wearing flips flops can affect your feet.

Flip-flops are not always the best choice of footwear. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

Flip-Flops and Feet

When the weather starts warming up, people enjoy wearing flip-flops.  Flip-flops are comfortable, stylish, and easy to slip on and off; they're perfect for any summer beach goer.  However, these shoes can cause harm to the feet.

How Can Flip-Flops Affect Me Long-Term?

  • Ankle problems
  • Hip problems
  • Lower back problems
  • Pain in the balls of the feet
  • Problems with foot arches
  • Changes in the way you walk

Are There Injuries Associated with Flip-Flops?

Yes.  Since flip-flops are relatively weak and do not provide the same amount of support as sneakers, people who wear flip-flops regularly are more susceptible to injuries. On top of that, the open nature of the shoe makes your feet more prone to other problems, such as cuts and even infections.  Common injuries and ailments include:

  • Sprained ankles
  • Blisters
  • Infections
  • Cuts and Scrapes

I like Wearing Flip-Flops. Are There Safe Alternatives?

When buying flip-flops, try to find ones that have sturdy soles and that are made of high-quality materials that will support for your feet.  These flip-flops will cost more but will also last longer as a result.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA.  We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Flip Flops and Feet

Research has shown the importance of wearing the correct running shoes that are appropriate for your style of running. Once the proper shoe size is determined, it may be beneficial to consider what type of running will be practiced. Trying shoes on later in the day when the feet are at their largest may help to ensure a proper fit. Additionally, the heel of the shoe should be solid, and this may help to provide stability to the feet and ankles. It may be beneficial to alternate between two pair of shoes, in addition to considering purchasing new shoes approximately five hundred miles. If you would like additional information about how to choose running shoes that are correct for you, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly guide you.

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even going barefoot.
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability.
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type
Monday, 25 March 2019

What Causes Morton’s Neuroma?

If you have a condition that is known as Morton’s neuroma, you may notice pain in the ball of the foot. This may be a result of an irritated nerve that has become enlarged, and may occur between the third and fourth toes. Patients who are afflicted with this condition may notice a burning sensation in the sole of the foot, in addition to the toes possibly becoming numb. A common reason why Morton’s neuroma may develop may include wearing shoes that are too tight, or choosing footwear that does not provide adequate room for the toes to move freely in. This may cause pressure to be exerted on the nerves in the toes, which may cause pain and discomfort. Existing medical conditions may precede the development of Morton’s neuroma, and these may include bunions, hammertoes, or flat feet. Mild relief may be found in resting the foot, and performing gentle stretching exercises. If you have symptoms of this condition, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat Morton’s neuroma.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Michael E. Newman of Pennsylvania. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Monday, 18 March 2019

What Causes Cuboid Syndrome?

There are bones located in the foot that are known as cuboid bones. Their function is to connect the ankle to the foot, in addition to providing stability. If the joints near the cuboid bones become torn or injured, a condition known as cuboid syndrome may develop. Common symptoms may include pain and discomfort on the side of the foot, swelling near the affected area, or weakness in the toes. Some patients notice their gait may be altered, and this may be a result of attempting to minimize the pain. This condition has several causes. These may include ankle injuries, repetitive strain caused by participating in sporting activities, or medical conditions such as flat feet. If you are afflicted with cuboid syndrome, it is advised to schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can guide you toward obtaining proper treatment.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Michael E. Newman from Pennsylvania. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Plymouth Meeting and Ambler, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
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